Interview with the Author: Part 3

Interviewer (I): Hello, all. Today, we’ll be interviewing Caitlin Cacciatore again on the projects she’s working on, and hopefully we’ll learn a little bit about the author as well.

 

Caitlin Cacciatore (CC): Ah, I see. Should I begin, or should you?

 

I: I do believe we’ve already started.

 

CC: Go ahead, then. Ask me anything.

 

I: So, Miss Cacciatore, what are you writing these days?

 

CC: Mostly poetry, to be honest. I find poetry wherever I go – case in point, just yesterday morning, I was walking my dog when I found an apple looking lonely by the side of the road. I went home and wrote a poem about it.

 

I: Let’s change characters for a moment. CC’s mother (M) has kindly agreed to interview her for part of this post.

 

CC: Brilliant.

 

M: What do you think is your worst quality?

 

CC: I believe my worst quality is my inability to let go of the past.

 

M: Fascinating. Tell me what you are interested in doing in the future.

 

CC: Well, I plan to keep writing. I also have a mission – to code empathy into Artificial Intelligence by combining deep learning with advances in neuroscience and quantum computing. I believe that this goal is vital in light of the upcoming Singularity.

 

M: I agree. What is your favorite book?

 

CC: The Picture of Dorian Grey moved me.

 

M: Why?

 

CC: I felt I could relate to Dorian’s quest for immortality. Though I know it ended badly for him, I do believe that my moral compass would protect me to a greater degree if I were to live beyond the average human lifespan.

 

M: Hmm. Let’s move on to education. What is the one subject everyone should study in school and why?

 

CC: I think that  the study of Artificial Intelligence should be essential to any university curriculum. I believe that it will be a huge part of our lives in the future, and that everyone should be well-informed about its potential dangers, advances, and ethical dilemmas.

 

M: Explain your philosophy of life in three sentences.

 

CC: Life doesn’t last, but it’s beautiful while it does. I fiercely believe in having a purpose, a mission, a goal in this life, in making a difference and living as boldly and as wildly and as audaciously as possible. Also – never, never give up, but do know when to lay down your arms and make your separate peace with the war you are waging, whatever that might be.

 

M: Well, I hope you’ve all learned a little bit about Miss Cacciatore through this interview. We’re just about finished.

 

CC: Yes, indeed. Thank you for tuning in. And thank you, mum, for interviewing me.

 

M: Anytime, love. Want to finish with something poetic?

 

CC: Isn’t the question mark at the end of this sentence poetry enough?

 

See also:

Interview with the Author: Part One

 

Interview with the Author: Part Two

 

Interview with the Author: Part 2

Interviewer: Today, I will be sitting down with Caitlin Cacciatore, poet, novelist, and dreamer. Her latest work is entitled Kingdom Come, and we here at her studio (namely, me, myself, and I) are getting very excited about how it is coming along. You ready, Caitlin?

 

Caitlin Cacciatore: Ready as I’ll ever be.

 

I: Let’s start with something easy. What inspired the title?

 

CC: I needed something new, something original, something that hadn’t been done and overdone. To the best of my knowledge, there are several other works with the same title, but I trust mine will be different enough that those other authors won’t feel I’m infringing upon their work. If so, I am fully prepared to change the title. I also briefly considered ‘To Ruin’ as the title. I wanted something that would describe, in two words, how vast the scope of this story is, how grand the perspectives.

 

I: How did you name your characters?

 

CC: When I first began a similar story, years and years ago, my character’s names were based upon letters of the Phoenician Alphabet. I decided to keep the first letter of each and change the rest of the names. Except for Resheph; he didn’t get a name change. He came late enough in Kingdom Come’s predecessor that I felt comfortable leaving his name. In case you were wondering, Zephyr means ‘of the west wind,’ Wren means ‘Ruler,’ and Dareh means ‘Rich.’ Only one of the meaning of their names will prove important to the story-line, but I’m not telling which one!

 

I: Tell us a little more about this story’s predecessor, We Sing of Shattered Skies.

 

CC: I believe I said in the last interview that it was epic, and I still hold that view. It was a story about how aliens were forced to abandon their homeworld after an accident, got stranded on Earth, and evolved into the dinosaurs. It was a childish attempt at science fiction, which is rather fitting, as I was but a child myself at the time of its writing.

 

I: If you could meet a character from your book, who would it be?

 

CC: You’re a big fan of asking the hard questions, aren’t you? (laughs) I think I would choose to spend a day with Dareh. You just can’t beat the title of “King of the Nine Worlds.”

 

On a similar note, do you have a secret favorite character?

 

CC: I have a very soft spot for Resheph, and of course I love all of my characters, but I’d have to say that Zephyr is my favorite so far. It could always change. I am always finding out new things about my character’s motivations, wants, needs, and desires. Sometimes they reveal something sinister.

 

I: Last question. Why are you driven to write this particular story, of all the stories you could tell?

 

CC: I wish I could tell you I had noble goals of saving the world with this book, but it’s just a story inside me that needs to come out. It’s the story my fingers and my heart and my soul are demanding me to write.

 

I: Thanks for coming, Caitlin. Any final words?

 

CC: You make it seem like we’re at the gallows. (laughs). I do, however, have a piece of advice: Never time travel. I promise you, it only ever breaks your heart in slow-motion and reverse-time and across the ages.

 

Interview with the Author

Interviewer (I): Today, we welcome the author of Kingdom Come, a space opera due to be released sometime in 2018. I will be interviewing Caitlin Cacciatore, AKA myself, using several questions found at this brilliant site. I will be using a randomizer to keep things fair.

 

Caitlin Cacciatore (CC): It is an absolute pleasure to be here. Shall we begin?

 

I: Yes, of course. The very first question is: What was your hardest scene to write?

 

CC: That is a tough question. I think the toughest scene I’ve written so far, without giving away too many spoilers, is the one where a future version of Zephyr goes back in time to warn Dareh that the war between Mars and Neptune has reached its breaking point and is about to spill onto neutral ground. That was a tragic scene to write. I really deeply care about my characters, and it broke my heart to have Zephyr break Dareh’s.

 

I: Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly?

 

CC: I think anyone can be a writer, if they set their mind to it. Not all stories need to be emotional in order to pack a huge impact. Sometimes novels and poems with muted emotions are even more powerful than their more emotional counterparts.

 

I: Naturally, I agree. Tell me, as a writer, what would you pick as your spirit animal/avatar?

 

CC: Hmmm… I do believe that I would choose a mythical beast like a griffin or a phoenix. Perhaps a siren. Definitely a siren, come to think of it.

 

I: How many published and half-finished books do you have?

 

CC: Too many to count! I wrote this one epic… We Sing of Shattered Skies. I was so enamored of this story that I took one of its elements and revitalized it as the premise of Kingdom Come. The original ended up being more than a thousand pages long, or about 350,000 words. So when I say epic, I mean it was epic.

 

I: Last question. Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

 

CC: I am still deciding. I do believe that I might stick with some motifs throughout all of the books I plan to write. For example, I might sneakily make sure that all my future character’s names begin with the same four letters as the four main characters in Kingdom Come. Namely, R for Resheph, D for Dareh, W for Wren, and Z for Zephyr.